Oct 3 - 24, 2024
Thursdays 11 am - 12:30 pm (PT)

The Rights of Nature:

Drafting, Adopting, and Enforcing Rights of Nature Laws

in Cities, Towns, and Counties

Live Online Course with Thomas Linzey & Mari Margil

REGISTER NOW
 

Do you want to support and protect nature in your own community?

"The Rights of Nature: Drafting, Adopting, and Enforcing Rights of Nature Laws in Cities, Towns, and Counties" will provide attendees a full background on the emerging “rights of nature” movement in the United States and internationally; prepare them to engage in their own communities to develop, adopt, and enforce local rights of nature laws; and address frequently asked questions.

The course will also include an overview of how indigenous communities are adopting and enforcing rights of nature laws. We will feature guest presenters, including key organizers in Ecuador and tribal attorneys in the U.S.

This course will run from October 3 - 24, 2024, with classes taking place on Thursdays from 11 am - 12:30 pm (PT). Classes will be held via Zoom, and recordings of each class will be available for registrants not able to attend a class here and there.

Course
Length

4 WEEKS

Start
Date

OCTOBER 3, 2024

Weekly
Sessions

THURSDAYS

WHAT YOU'LL LEARN:

  • The Indigenous origins of rights of nature and its evolution into Western legal theory

  • How to support the rights of nature in your community and elsewhere

  • How to speak effectively about the concept of the rights of nature, including how to counter opposition arguments

  • An in-depth understanding of rights of nature laws and court decisions around the world, including with tribal and first nations, Ecuador, Bolivia, India, Colombia, Brazil, Canada, Spain, and elsewhere

  • How tribal rights of nature laws have succeeded in the United States

  • Strategies for advancing rights of nature laws in your communities

NATURE HAS
A RIGHT TO
EXIST

NATURE HAS
A RIGHT TO
FLOURISH

NATURE HAS
A RIGHT TO
REGENERATE

NATURE HAS
A RIGHT TO
EVOLVE

MEET YOUR INSTRUCTORS

Thomas Linzey serves as senior legal counsel for the Center for Democratic and Environmental Rights. He is widely recognized as the founder of the contemporary “community rights” and “rights of nature” movements which have resulted in the adoption of several hundred laws across the United States and around the world.

Linzey is a cum laude graduate of Widener Law School, a three-time recipient of the law school’s public interest law award, and a former finalist for the Ford Foundation’s Leadership for a Changing World Award. He is the author of On Community Civil Disobedience in the Name of Sustainability and other books, and his work has been featured in the New York Times, the New Yorker, the Los Angeles Times, Mother Jones, and the Nation magazine. He has been named one of Forbes’ magazines’ “Top Ten Revolutionaries,” and one of the top 400 environmentalists of the last 200 years in American Environmental Leaders. Linzey lives in Spokane, Washington.

Mari Margil is the Executive Director of the Center for Democratic and Environmental Rights (CDER). She works with civil society; national, state, and local governments; tribal nations; and indigenous communities in the U.S., Ecuador, Australia, the Philippines, Nepal, and elsewhere, to advance Rights of Nature frameworks. She consulted with Ecuador’s Constituent Assembly, helping to draft the world’s first Rights of Nature constitutional provisions.

Margil received her Master’s degree from Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, and is a co-author of The Bottom Line or Public Health (Oxford University Press 2010), Exploring Wild Law: The Philosophy of Earth Jurisprudence (Wakefield Press 2011), and Bearing Witness: The Human Rights Case Against Fracking and Climate Change (Oregon State University Press 2021). Her writing has also been featured in publications including The Guardian, YES! Magazine, Earth Island Journal, Mongabay, Democracy Journal, World Policy Journal, and Common Dreams.

COURSE MODULES

ˮ

Nature, or Pacha Mama, where life is reproduced and occurs, has the right to integral respect for its existence and for the maintenance and regeneration of its life cycles, structure, functions and evolutionary processes.

ECUADOR'S 2008 CONSTITUTION
ENSHRINING RIGHTS OF NATURE

The Rights of Nature:
Drafting, Adopting, and Enforcing Rights of Nature Laws in Cities, Towns, and Counties

$349

With Thomas Linzey & Mari Margil

Register Now